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Shoes for Fashionistas

March 23, 2013
Plain English Version

Men and women are wearing odd-looking shoes called creepers. They cannot fail to be big hits.

Originally meant for men, designers are creating them for women. Prada, Stella McCartney and other fashion shoe lines are putting them on the shelves of shoe salons.

Prada

The shoes use suede uppers and big crepe soles. The designs go back to the era of punk and grunge with a little bit of preppy thrown in.

A designer said the creeper’s clumsy look makes it a daring, independent choice. Some are calling it “cinder block chic.” “They are the opposite of glamorous” said another designer.

The shoe design goes back to World War II, when soldiers wore them as desert boots while on leave.

They are the rage of the fashionistaset. They are still hard to find. However, knockoffs are being made in China and sold on eBay for as little as $30.

Stella McCartney

Celebrities including Pedro Almodóvar, Rhianna, Madonna, Jude Law and Ashley Olsen are wearing them.

Some big stores, such as Bloomingdales, are waiting to see how popular creepers are.

Source: The Wall Street Journal

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