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Health Insurance and Courts Challenge Immigrants and Migrants

September 21, 2014
Plain English Version
www.theepochtimes.com5610 × 3499Search by image Unaccompanied minors who reach New York are being met by representatives who help the children register for school and other services.  Thanks to AP Photo/Eric Ga)

Unaccompanied minors who reach New York are being met by representatives who help the children register for school and other services. Thanks to AP Photo/Eric Gay

Losing Health Insurance

Helping Migrant Minors

Thousands of immigrants may lose their health insurance. They did not prove they were legal residents or citizens. They did give enough information about their incomes.

Notices will begin to go out on October 1, 2014.

The government said almost a million people did not provide enough information. More than 100,000 of them may lose their health insurance.

Advocates say red tape is the reason that so many people did not respond. Many blame it on the new insurance web site, healthcare.gov. Only people who got their health insurance from the federal exchange are included.

More than eight out of 10 people who signed up between October and mid-April were eligible for subsidies, including income tax credits.

Under the Affordable Care Act undocumented residents are not eligible for federal health insurance Some states provide Medicaid type benefits for all their low-income residents.

Helping Migrant Minors

Many children who recently crossed the border are now in the courts. Advocates in New York City agree that judges are very gentle with them

New York City said it would send agents to federal immigration courts. New York’s mayor said the city was taking a “humanitarian approach.” Talks with migrant children will take place outside the courtroom.

All over the country migrants face expedited hearings. New York City says the best thing to do is to match children with services and programs that are already in place.

Registering for school and getting health care are the two biggest problems.

Advocates from other communities are reaching out to New York to ask for advice.

Sources:  The New York Times September 15, 2014 The New York Times September 17, 2014

 

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